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The inaugural 2018 University of California Digital Library Forum (UC DLFx) "Building the UC Digital Library: Theory and Practice" will explore a range of topics such as engaging, enhancing our communities and creating data from materials at our respective University of California libraries; demystifying data curation; project collaboration; using emerging technologies such as 3D scanning to enhance access, and creating a UC system wide standard for born digital archival material.

UC DLFx is SOLD OUT!!!


Shared community notes on Google for each session, http://bit.ly/2oqzwuC

Map of the UC Riverside campus: https://campusmap.ucr.edu/

Please visit the UC DLFx wiki page for more information: http://bit.ly/UC-DLFx-2018


The conference will be held in the Highlander Union Building (HUB), Third Floor
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Tuesday, February 27
 

8:00am

Registration
The registration desk will be located on the third floor of the HUB near HUB 355.

Tuesday February 27, 2018 8:00am - 1:00pm
HUB 355

9:00am

Archiving AV: Analog to Born Digital
To Register: https://archiving-av-2018.eventbrite.com

Audiovisual media is ever increasing and contributing to backlogs in libraries and archives where analog materials experience degradation, deposited hard drives sit on shelves, and digital files languish on servers. Many librarians and archivists consider audiovisual collections to be a challenge to preservation due to rapid format obsolescence, barriers to digitization, and popular software-as-a-service archiving models that limit practitioners’ knowledge and participation in the digital archiving process.

In this half-day workshop fundamental questions will be addressed including:

-What constitutes an archive of audiovisual media and how does one address digitization?
-How can an archive curate and steward a born digital AV collection for preservation and access?
-How can archiving AV be practical, efficient, and cost-effective?

This workshop curriculum will include characteristics of analog and born digital AV, methods of digitization and digital curation, efficient and practical digital tools, and preservation strategies for retention and access.

Space is limited, a waitlist will be generated when capacity is met. If registered and can no longer participate, please notify stelnabli@ucsd.edu.

*Continental breakfast is included.

Speakers
avatar for Stefan Elnabli

Stefan Elnabli

Media Curation Librarian \\ Supervisor, Digital Reformatting Operations, UC San Diego
Stefan Elnabli is UC San Diego Library's Media Curation Librarian and Digital Reformatting Operations supervisor, providing strategic direction in the Library's management, preservation, and access of moving image collections. Elnabli's engagement with visual culture and digital repository... Read More →


Tuesday February 27, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Orbach 240

9:00am

Data Curation Unconference
To Register: https://data-curation-unconference-2018.eventbrite.com

This half-day unconference will address data management problems facing libraries across California, providing a forum for participants to bring up difficulties and unsolved issues in their work and receive suggestions based on experiences from different campuses. Challenges discussed can range from infrastructure to shifting cultural practices.

To make the most of our three hours, we will solicit problem statements before the meeting. In the spirit of a true unconference, topics can also be added at the very start of the meeting. The top up-voted problems will be discussed during the first session. After group discussions, the outcomes will be reported back to the whole group. Since the outcome of these discussions may influence the preferences for other topics, the voting process will be repeated prior to the second session. Based on previous experience at the California Data Librarians unconference in 2017, we consider this problem-solving session of great value to librarians and analysts involved with data management.

*Continental breakfast is included.

Tuesday February 27, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Rivera 140

9:00am

Git and Github for Metadata
To Register: https://git-for-metadata-2018.eventbrite.com

This half-day workshop will cover a modified version of the “Version Control with Git” Software Carpentry lesson, tailored for a non-developer audience, with examples focusing on using Git/GitHub for metadata management.

This is a hands-on technical workshop. Attendees will all need to bring laptops with Git pre-installed and the course materials downloaded. Course materials will be provided by email to registered attendees before the event date.

*Continental breakfast is included.

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra Dunn

Alexandra Dunn

Programmer, UCSB
AH

Arwen Hutt

Metadata Specialist, UC San Diego
avatar for Chrissy Rissmeyer

Chrissy Rissmeyer

Coordinator of Digital Content / Metadata Librarian, UC Santa Barbara


Tuesday February 27, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Rivera 403

11:00am

UCR Library Creat'R Lab
Come join us in the UCR Library Creat’R Lab, a place where new technologies, scientific curiosity, and entrepreneurship come together across disciplines.

The lab is an innovative learning environment in which students, faculty and researchers can experiment with tools and technologies that will allow them to deepen their knowledge and extend their research. Equipment includes 3D printers, 3D scanners and associated software, basic hand tools, electronics for prototyping, tools for working with textiles, and more. Experts will provide individual consultations as well as workshops on both tools and conceptual skills.

Library staff will be on-hand to provide attendees with an overview of this unique space and to answer questions.

Tuesday February 27, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Orbach 140

11:00am

UCR Library Special Collections & University Archives 4 to Explore
Come visit Special Collections & University Archives to view materials from our new 4 to Explore program that began in Fall 2017. This program provides our campus community with an opportunity each month to stop by and interact with special collections materials in order to get a taste of the collections that truly make UCR unique.

Library staff will be on-hand to talk about these materials and answer questions. Rotating exhibits of items from the collections will also be on-display in the reading room for viewing.

Tuesday February 27, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
Rivera 416

1:15pm

Welcome/Keynote #1
Join us for the opening of UC DLFx! Welcome remarks from Steven Mandeville-Gamble, University Librarian (UCR Library).

Keynote Talk: "Big Data, Little Data, or No Data? Scholarship, Stewardship, and Building the UC Digital Library" by Christine L. Borgman.

The University of California has pioneered digital library services for the last four decades, since the early days of Melvyl and the Division of Library Automation. These services now encompass bibliographic records, digital content, research data, and more. Data stewardship reflects the array of digital library challenges in both theory and practice. While the popularity of “big data” reflects the growth of data-intensive research, “little data” remains the norm in those many fields where evidence is scarce and labor-intensive to acquire. Until recently, data was considered part of the process of scholarship, essential but largely invisible. In the “big data” era, data have become valuable products to be captured, shared, reused, and stewarded for the long term. They also have become contentious intellectual property to be protected. Public policy leans toward open access to research data, but rarely provides the public investment necessary to sustain access. Data practices are local, varying from field to field, individual to individual, and country to country. Until the larger questions of knowledge infrastructures and stewardship are addressed by research communities, “no data” may become the norm for many fields. This talk will explore the stakes and stakeholders in research data and implications for policy and practice, drawn from the presenter’s recent book, Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (MIT Press, 2015).

Speakers
avatar for Christine L. Borgman

Christine L. Borgman

Distinguished Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies, UCLA
Christine L. Borgman, Distinguished Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA, is the author of more than 250 publications in information studies, computer science, and communication. These include three books from MIT Press: Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship... Read More →
avatar for Steven Mandeville-Gamble

Steven Mandeville-Gamble

University Librarian, UCR
As University Librarian, Steven Mandeville-Gamble is the chief administrator for the UCR Library, envisioning and leading its mission to meet the needs of UCR on its path to preeminence. He came from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. where he served as Associate University... Read More →


Tuesday February 27, 2018 1:15pm - 2:30pm
HUB 355

2:30pm

Break
Beverages (including coffee) and light snacks will be available.

Tuesday February 27, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
HUB 355

3:00pm

Developing Technologies Together: The Secret Sauce for Collaboration
Are you considering a collaborative project? In today’s digital library climate with increased interest in community-based development work, technology collaboration is an enticing, seemingly efficient and cooperative way to build digital systems that meet the needs of many. A sound, productive community and development structure is core to any successful technology collaboration. In this session, we will share a number of different co-development project scenarios including different communication strategies, project management approaches, and management tools. We hope to examine patterns for success and note lessons learned that can help you shape your future co-development experiences. Newcomers and seasoned collaborators are all welcome. Join us for lively and informative retrospectives of co-development stories.

Speakers
avatar for Declan Fleming

Declan Fleming

Chief Technology Strategist, UCSD Library
RH

Rachael Hu

UX Manager, California Digital Library (CDL)
Rachael works as the User Experience Design Manager at California Digital Library-- facilitating the user-centered design process for projects across programs and services at CDL. She has a Master's of Science in Information from the University of Michigan where she pursued a tailored... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Hui

Barbara Hui

Software Developer/Technical Committee Chair, California Digital Library
EL

Emily Lin

Head of Digital Curation and Scholarship, UC Merced
avatar for Mark Matney

Mark Matney

Digital Library Software Developer, UCLA
I studied Computer Science at UCLA and have been at the library since September 2015. Some of the things I've worked on: | - plugins for Mirador 2.x (IIIF Presentation API viewer) | - mirador.library.ucla.edu (flexible workspace) | - bootstrapping ResourceSync using existing... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn Stine

Kathryn Stine

Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy, California Digital Library
avatar for Marisa Strong

Marisa Strong

Lead/App Dev Manager, California Digital Library
Application Development, People Management, Leadership, Agile, Development Process. I'm interested in collaborative solutions that allow us to share ideas leading to more effective and efficient ways to solve problems.
avatar for Michael Thwaites

Michael Thwaites

Senior Developer, Califoirnia Digital Library


Tuesday February 27, 2018 3:00pm - 3:55pm
HUB 355

3:00pm

EZIDs and ORCIDs and CDL
A set of short talks with plenty of time for questions pertaining to CDL services related to persistent identifiers.

Speakers
avatar for John Kunze

John Kunze

Identifier Systems Architect, California Digital Library
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

California Digital Library
avatar for David Moles

David Moles

Senior Software Developer, California Digital Library
avatar for Lisa Schiff

Lisa Schiff

Technical Lead, Access & Publishing, California Digital Library
scholarly communication, open access publishing, metadata, repositories, ORCID, EZID DOIs
avatar for Joan Starr

Joan Starr

EZID Service Manager, California Digital Library
PIDs, citation, open sharing (data, software, scholarship, etc), Force11...


Tuesday February 27, 2018 3:00pm - 3:55pm
HUB 367

3:00pm

UC Data Network: A Systemwide Solution for Free Research Data Management / Beyond the Repository: Exploring Integration Between Local and Distributed Digital Preservation Systems (Combined Session A)
UC Data Network: A Systemwide Solution for Free Research Data Management
The UC Data Network is a partnership between CDL and campus libraries, CIOs and VCRs to build a sustainable and reliable network for sharing research data. In the UCDN, campuses contribute preservation storage to a common pool for use by CDL’s Dash data publication service and Merritt preservation repository for managing, preserving, and providing access to a growing collection of UC research data. UC researchers face new obligations for proactive and sustainable research data management (RDM) in the form of funder mandates, publication requirements, institutional policies, and evolving norms of academic best practice. While some researchers have access to appropriate disciplinary repositories, these opportunities are not uniformly available across the UC community. By relying upon in-kind contribution of storage capacity rather than direct campus recharge, UCDN removes the primary barrier to wider campus adoption of Dash and Merritt, which can now be offered for use at no cost to individual researchers. This presentation will provide an update on UCDN activities and solicit suggestions for potential improvements or added-value research data management services.

Beyond the Repository: Exploring Integration Between Local and Distributed Digital Preservation Systems
Many institutions have established digital repository systems in order to preserve the valuable scholarship and cultural heritage that is either generated or collected by their constituencies. In addition, many of these same organizations have distributed copies of these digital materials to multiple locations in order to mitigate the risks associated with lack of geographic diversity, lack of technological diversity, and loss of data related to human activities and systems failures. Services like APTrust, DPN, and Chronopolis have developed, in part, to provide this geographical diversity. As these services have matured, the problem of tracking data from a local repository to a distributed preservation service has not been resolved. Northwestern and University of California, San Diego were awarded an IMLS Planning Grant (LG-72-16-0135-16) to explore the integration between local repositories and distributed digital preservation systems. This grant seeks to answer questions like, “How does one curate objects to ingest into a long-term dark preservation system?” as well as questions regarding managing multiple copies and versions of digital objects in multiple systems and the implications of varying storage structures on data restoration. To uncover answers, the grant team distributed a survey and also conducted a series of in-depth interviews with cultural heritage institutions. This talk will describe the findings from both, highlighting results regarding criteria used in curation decisions, versioning practices, common workflows and workarounds, and the use (or not) of preservation policies.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Abrams

Stephen Abrams

Associate Director, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library
SS

Sibyl Schaefer

Digital Preservation Analyst for Research Data Curation; Chronopolis Program Manager, UCSD
Sibyl Schaefer is the Chronopolis Program Manager and Digital Preservation Analyst for the University of California, San Diego. She has spent much of her career working with archival systems for arrangement, description, and preservation. She has been recognized as an Emerging Leader... Read More →



Tuesday February 27, 2018 3:00pm - 4:55pm
HUB 379

4:05pm

Publishing Molars and Mandibles: Challenges and Opportunities Associated with Emerging Technologies / The Creat'R Lab: Starting and Sustaining a Makerspace in the Library (Combined Session B)
Publishing Molars and Mandibles: Challenges and Opportunities Associated with Emerging Technologies
Emerging technologies such as three-dimensional printing and scanning are becoming increasingly available in higher education, including in many libraries. By utilizing these technologies, librarians and researchers can make fragile and often impossible to access artifacts readily available to anyone with an internet connection. We will be using a small collection of Neolithic bones from Masis Blur, Armenia (ca. 6200 – 5400 cal.BC), as a case study to examine the ins and outs of 3D scanning as a means of preserving and publishing work. To start, a brief overview of the scanning technology will be given, with a few pointers about some of the limitations of the technology. Select samples from the collection will be showcased, both the 3D scan and a 3D printed copy of the artifact. After the scanning hardware and workflows have been discussed, we will discuss how this partnership has promoted the preservation and sharing of research data. We will also discuss designing best practices and a workflow for scholars to deposit 3D models and descriptive metadata into UCLA's institutional repository. We will end with an examination of the different academic applications and some of the challenges associated with publishing digital 3D content online.

The Creat'R Lab: Starting and Sustaining a Makerspace in the Library
This presentation will highlight the case study of the Creat'R Lab, a makerspace formed in partnership between the UCR Library and the Office of Research and Economic Development. Presenters will describe decisions made in the first year of the makerspace, with a focus on three key areas: policies and staffing, campus outreach, and 3D printing and makerspace technologies. Attendees will hear our lessons learned and leave the session with an understanding of how to start a makerspace at their institution. Additionally, interested UC DLF attendees will be able to take a tour of the Creat'R Lab during their time at the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Doug Daniels

Doug Daniels

Lux Lab Coordinator, UCLA Library
avatar for Brianna Marshall

Brianna Marshall

Director of Research Services, UC Riverside
MP

Michele Potter

Open Research Librarian, UCR
DW

Deidre Whitmore

Digital Archaeology Lab and Data Publication Manager, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA



Tuesday February 27, 2018 4:05pm - 5:00pm
HUB 367

4:05pm

ResourceSync at UCLA: PRL Use Case / IIIF Tiling on Demand with AWS Lambda / Building & Managing a Large Collaborative Open GIS Project (Combined Session C)
ResourceSync at UCLA: PRL Use Case
Pacific Rim Library provides access to aggregated metadata records from the Pacific Rim Research Library Alliance (PRRLA), an organization of academic libraries surrounding the Pacific. With grant funds from PRRLA, the UCLA Library has completed the first phase of the ‘next generation’ PRL with a redesigned interface and an upgrade to ResourceSync. We have developed and contributed to open source software that enables institutions to deploy ResourceSync capabilities that plug into their existing OAI-PMH repository. The presentation will provide an overview of the project and a forum for discussing opportunities for ResourceSync development and implementation at UC.

IIIF Tiling on Demand with AWS Lambda
Some digital library image projects require a full-fledged IIIF image server that can generate images of varying dimensions on demand. Others just need to provide an interactive image zooming functionality. For the latter types of projects, it's sufficient to pre-generate image tiles to be served from a IIIF "Level 0" tile server (which might be a IIIF-specific tile server or just a generic Web server like Apache or Nginx). This approach saves disk space, simplifies the system architecture, and may not require an additional caching layer to make the serving of tiles performant. At UCLA, we've written a IIIF tiling server that pre-generates the tiles for IIIF viewers like OpenSeadragon, Mirador, and the UniversalViewer. We started using it by running the tiling process on AWS EC2 instances; that gave us processing power on demand without the need to provision and maintain a local server. That approach worked well, but in time we realized we could simplify the process even further by extracting the tiling functionality onto AWS Lambda. We propose to talk about our experiences doing this and why we think Lambda is a good fit for IIIF tile generation.

Building & Managing a Large Collaborative Open GIS Project
Libraries are increasingly involved in providing data management and GIS services, consultations, project collaboration, and creating open digital data collections. In this talk, Michele and Tom discuss the American Viticulture Areas (AVA) Project and address how the tools and workflows used to create and manage this dataset can be repurposed for other data collections with multiple contributors with limited infrastructure and funding. The AVA Project began as a collaboration between UC Davis and UCSB to create digital spatial data for all 239 boundaries of the American Viticulture Areas as described in the US ATPF Code of Regulations in support of key research conducted at our institutions. The AVA Project utilizes user-contribution practices in the GIS community that have successfully generated open-licensed global datasets like Open Street Map combined with US government documents, open data formats (geoJSON), open source GIS software (QGIS), and collaboration tools (GitHub) to provide a high-quality open and accessible research resource. The project provides the dataset free of charge through a system that accepts contributions, corrections, and updates. The methods employed in the AVA Project provide a framework for managing other collaborative data creation projects, including contributions from multiple campuses as well as entities outside the UC.

Speakers
KA

Kristian Allen

Digital Library Technical Lead, UCLA
avatar for Tom Brittnacher

Tom Brittnacher

Geospatial Data Curator, UC Santa Barbara
avatar for Kevin S. Clarke

Kevin S. Clarke

Digital Library Software Developer, UCLA
avatar for Rosalie Lack

Rosalie Lack

Project Manager, UCLA
I am a Project Manager at the UCLA Digital Library responsible for grant-funded initiatives, including the International Digital Ephemera Project (IDEP), the Next Generation Pacific Rim Library (PRL), and the Sinai Library Digitization Project (SLDP) project. Prior to joining UCLA... Read More →
avatar for Mark Matney

Mark Matney

Digital Library Software Developer, UCLA
I studied Computer Science at UCLA and have been at the library since September 2015. Some of the things I've worked on: | - plugins for Mirador 2.x (IIIF Presentation API viewer) | - mirador.library.ucla.edu (flexible workspace) | - bootstrapping ResourceSync using existing... Read More →
avatar for Michele Tobias

Michele Tobias

GIS Data Curator, UC Davis
I am the GIS Data Curator at the UC Davis Library. I am a geographer and ecologist with many years of experience with geospatial tools. My particular area of expertise is in applying open source software to answer research questions and coastal biogeography.



Tuesday February 27, 2018 4:05pm - 5:00pm
HUB 355

4:05pm

Demystifying Data Curation
Curation, particularly of data, can feel like an amorphous process. The lack of clear definition may prevent library staff from being willing to engage with it. Since data management is a new frontier in digital libraries, and data curation is an important component of it, it is important to unpack the process to enable more library staff to engage with it.

In this presentation, we define data curation in a set of specific steps and actions. We give concrete examples of how we have applied them and discuss the difficulty level of each step as well as the skillset required to undertake it. We discuss how these steps contribute to our goals of making data discoverable, citable, comprehensible, and reusable.

Speakers
VE

Vessela Ensberg

Associate Director Data Management, UC Davis
EL

Emily Lin

Head of Digital Curation and Scholarship, UC Merced
avatar for Amy Neeser

Amy Neeser

Research Data Management Program Manager, University of California Berkeley
As the University of California Berkeley's Research Data Management (RDM) Program Manager, I ensure the effective design and coordination of RDM issues and services across campus. I oversee the program and its services to academic departments and service units and am responsible for... Read More →
avatar for Ho Jung Yoo

Ho Jung Yoo

Technical Analyst for Research Data Curation, Ho Jung Yoo



Tuesday February 27, 2018 4:05pm - 5:00pm
HUB 379

6:30pm

Reception
Come join us for the opening reception in the Coil Brothers Atrium at the California Museum of Photography in Downtown Riverside. Appetizers and refreshments, including hosted beer and wine, will be served.

Tuesday February 27, 2018 6:30pm - 8:30pm
California Museum of Photography 3824 Main St, Riverside, CA 92501
 
Wednesday, February 28
 

8:00am

Morning Snacks
Coffee, tea, pastries, and fruit will be available in HUB 355.

Wednesday February 28, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
HUB 355

8:00am

Registration
The registration desk will be located on the third floor of the HUB near HUB 355.

Wednesday February 28, 2018 8:00am - 8:30am
HUB 355

8:30am

Clear Collaboration / “Out of Many, One”: Creating a UC-Wide Descriptive Standard for Born-Digital Archival Material (Combined Session D)
Clear Collaboration
Collaborations in digitization projects have become commonplace. Institutions work together on thematic projects, often in pursuit of grant funding, in efforts to reveal hidden collections and unite related collections. Projects involving multiple institutions and vendors highlight the need for effective communication and tracking methods for achieving accurate results, and the ability to make changes without losing data. We will discuss several digitization projects - The State Medical Society Journal project, The Eric Berne papers, The Bay Area Response to the AIDS Crisis project, and UC Merced’s work with Yosemite National Park and the Merced County Historical Society. We will discuss how we established shared expectations around key issues, including intellectual property rights management, as well as project management and communications throughout the project lifecycle for these collaborations.

“Out of Many, One”: Creating a UC-Wide Descriptive Standard for Born-Digital Archival Material
Currently, there is no descriptive standard that adequately addresses born-digital archival material, and institutional practices for creating finding aids to these collections vary substantially.

A major challenge is that DACS, the official content standard of the U.S. archival community, does not provide specific guidelines for born-digital materials. This is compounded by the relationship DACS has to other standards, such as MARC and EAD, which do not always align in the context of born-digital.

The lack of clear guidance results in finding aids that do not fully describe the quality, quantity, and usability of digital material. This diminishes accessibility and ensures that each organization must ‘re-invent the wheel’ when describing this content. To improve the clarity and usefulness of finding aids, and to promote consistency across campuses, digital archivists from the UC system have developed a descriptive standard for born-digital archival material.

Presenters will provide an overview of their work, including the project’s impetus and methodology, discuss how it has contributed to the sustainability of the team’s respective digital archive programs, and share lessons learned. Particular emphasis will be placed on the collaborative nature of this work, and on opportunities to put the standard into use beyond the UC system.

Speakers
DK

David Krah

Project Archivist, University of California, San Francisco
David Krah has worked as a project archivist since 2010 at a variety of Bay Area institutions including the San Francisco Public Library, Stanford University and currently University of California San Francisco.
EL

Emily Lin

Head of Digital Curation and Scholarship, UC Merced
avatar for Charles Macquarie

Charles Macquarie

Digital Archivist, UCSF
avatar for Kate Tasker

Kate Tasker

Digital Archivist, The Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley
Kate Tasker works with born-digital collections and information management systems to enable and enhance research access at The Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley. She holds an MLIS from San Jose State University and is a member of SAA, the Academy of Certified Archivists, & the Society... Read More →



Wednesday February 28, 2018 8:30am - 9:25am
HUB 379

8:30am

Library Carpentry: Data and Software Skills Training for Librarians / Launching the Digital Lifecycle program @ UCB (Combined Session E)
Library Carpentry: Data and Software Skills Training for Librarians
Library Carpentry is an open education volunteer network and lesson organization dedicated to teaching librarians data and software skills. The goal is to help librarians better engage with constituents and improve how they do their work. This talk will serve as an introduction on how Library Carpentry formed in 2015, evolved as a global community of library professionals and will continue as a future sibling of the Carpentries, an umbrella organization of distinct lesson organizations, such as Data and Software Carpentry. We’ll cover existing collaborative lesson development, curricula coverage, workshop activities and the global instructor community. We’ll then talk about the future coordinating activities led by the UC system to align and prepare for a merging with Data and Software Carpentry.

Launching the Digital Lifecycle Program @ UCB
In FY2018, UC Berkeley is launching an expanded program to convert, preserve and publish our physical collections as digital collections. Called the Digital Lifecycle Program, the effort aims to digitize and publish the major collections of UC Berkeley over the next decade. This session will recap our planning process and present the operational framework that is being created.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Dennis

Tim Dennis

Director, Social Sciences Data Archive, Data Archive - UCLA Library
LG

Lynne Grigsby

Head, Libary IT, UC Berkeley
EM

Erik Mitchell

Associate University Librarian, Digital Initiatives and Collaborative Services, UC Berkeley
I'm a librarian, administrator and researcher who cares about how libraries impact our daily lives. I have a passion for structured data and can be easily drawn into a conversation about why we focus so much library energy on metadata and information systems.


Wednesday February 28, 2018 8:30am - 9:25am
HUB 367

8:30am

Participatory Digital Collections: Engaging Opportunities for Enhancement, Experimentation and Transformation
Library digital collections have the potential to move beyond access and serve as engaging platforms for enhancement, experimentation, and transformation. This panel will highlight a few such collections/projects that illustrate ways in which we are engaging our communities and creating data from materials at our respective University of California libraries. The panelists will discuss the merits of projects that scale vs. high-touch examples (and why boutique isn’t necessarily a dirty word) and will explore how smaller-scale projects enable us to model digital collection interactions and how exploratory work with collections data provide opportunities to demonstrate use cases for enhancing, re-mixing, and re-using our digital collections. The panel will close with a discussion on issues related to digitization selection, and suggest (for broader discussion) selection criteria that can facilitate more participatory, data-rich (or potentially data-rich) digital collections.

Speakers
AE

Amy E Azzarito

Assistant Director of Online Strategy, UC Davis Library
PB

Peter Broadwell

Academic Projects Developer, UCLA
DC

Dawn Childress

Librarian, Digital Collections and Scholarship, UCLA
avatar for Carl G. Stahmer

Carl G. Stahmer

Director of Data and Digital Scholarship, UC Davis
Carl G. Stahmer, PhD is the Director of Data and Digital Scholarship at the University Library, University of California, Davis, in which capacity he oversees a variety of digital initiatives on campus. He also serves as Associate Director for Humanities at the UC Davis Data Science... Read More →


Wednesday February 28, 2018 8:30am - 9:25am
HUB 355

9:35am

Appraisal and Description of Social Media Collections / Cobweb: Collaborative Digital Collection Development for Web Archives (Combined Session F)
Appraisal and Description of Social Media Collections
Social media has become a primary space archivists are beginning to explore as an avenue to building rich collections of primary source materials. It is a complex space where topics around politics, culture, entertainment, and social issues are frequently discussed. In addition to the large volume of data present in social media, several different types of content formats can be found there as well, including images, photographs, videos, and websites. This makes it difficult for archivists to make sense of the content. While the collection of social media data has received a lot of attention around software development and large-scale collecting issues, less attention has been paid to the meaningful collection of that content (i.e. appraisal) with the goal of building research collections.


This session will focus on two projects aimed at the appraisal and description of social media content in special collections. One revolving around the work of the Documenting the Now project which aims to build tools for archivists to help them appraise social media content and the other, a proof-of-concept project in the UCR library to represent social media content in finding aids and as digital collections.


Cobweb: Collaborative Digital Collection Development for Web Archives
The demands of archiving the web in comprehensive breadth or thematic depth easily exceed the capacity of any single institution. As such, collaborative approaches to web archiving are necessary, and their success relies on curators understanding both what has already been archived, by whom, and how. With funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Cobweb, a joint project of the California Digital Library, UCLA, and Harvard University, supports three key functions of collaborative collection development: nominating, claiming, and holdings. Curators establish thematic collecting projects in Cobweb and encourage nominators to suggest relevant websites as candidates for archiving. For any given project, archival programs can claim their intention to capture a subset of nominated sites. Cobweb interacts with external data sources to populate a holdings registry, aggregating metadata about existing collections and crawled sites to support curators in planning future collecting activity and researchers in exploring archived web resources useful to their research.


Presenters will share recent project activities, including a walkthrough of the most current Cobweb prototype.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Abrams

Stephen Abrams

Associate Director, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library
avatar for Bergis Jules

Bergis Jules

University Archivist, University of California, Riverside
 
avatar for Eric Milenkiewicz

Eric Milenkiewicz

Digital Initiatives Program Manager, UC Riverside
avatar for Kathryn Stine

Kathryn Stine

Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy, California Digital Library
AW

Andrew Wallace

Digital Library Software Developer, UCLA



Wednesday February 28, 2018 9:35am - 10:30am
HUB 355

9:35am

Digital Conversion in the Modern Research Ecosystem / Building the Discography of American Historical Recordings into a 78rpm Mass Digitization Project / Fed Doc Big Data Big Items (Combined Session G)
Digital Conversion in the Modern Research Ecosystem
Conversion to or within the digital domain is integral to the preservation, access, and stewardship of digital collections, but how does one measure its value in the modern research ecosystem beyond its ability to provide a means for access? Decisions made in any conversion phase have great influence on outcomes of preservation, access, and digital scholarship. As such, conversion in the context of digital preservation models and theories about knowledge production plays an important role in digital curation and the wisdom produced from humanities research. This talk will explore thinking about librarianship and digital humanities through an illustration of how digital conversion and scholarship share a tendency to influence each other’s goals, aims, abilities, and outcomes toward sustainable and innovative stewardship of digital collections.

Building the Discography of American Historical Recordings into a 78rpm Mass Digitization Project
The UC Santa Barbara Library, with support from the Packard Humanities Institute, is building out its audio digitization program to enable the library to digitize historical 78rpm sound recordings at scale. The project integrates the Discography of American Historical Recordings database with a new mass digitization workflow, to increase efficiency, dramatically lower costs, and reduce errors. The library is currently digitizing 200 titles per week and ramping up to digitize 500+ titles per week. This talk explores our unique philosophy of digital library creation, issues we’ve faced in building the project out to scale, and issues with providing online access.




Fed Doc Big Data Big Items
Description coming soon!

Speakers
avatar for Stefan Elnabli

Stefan Elnabli

Media Curation Librarian \\ Supervisor, Digital Reformatting Operations, UC San Diego
Stefan Elnabli is UC San Diego Library's Media Curation Librarian and Digital Reformatting Operations supervisor, providing strategic direction in the Library's management, preservation, and access of moving image collections. Elnabli's engagement with visual culture and digital repository... Read More →
LG

Lynne Grigsby

Head, Libary IT, UC Berkeley
avatar for David Seubert

David Seubert

Curator, Performing Arts Collection/PI, American Discography Project, UC Santa Barbara


Wednesday February 28, 2018 9:35am - 10:30am
HUB 367

9:35am

Lightning Talks
24 (Research Data) Things at UCI
One of the UC Irvine Libraries strategic goals was to provide further training on data management and curation for liaison librarians and staff. Utilizing the 23 (Research Data) Things from ANDS, a 10-week asynchronous course was created using the free version of the Canvas LMS.  The online course still contains three levels of learning but the “Things” are organized into modules, with a new module being released each week.  An online asynchronous approach was created due to staff and time constraints which would make instructor lead instruction/orientations difficult to administer.  A beta test of the course was recently conducted with a small group of librarians. This presentation will share the online course, what worked and didn’t work, and the feedback gathered from beta participants.

SRLF Imaging Service
An overview of the Imaging Services (IS) Unit located at the Southern Regional Library Facility (SRLF) on the UCLA campus. Staffed by 4 full time image capture technicians, the IS unit fulfills scanning requests from UCLA, the other nine UC Libraries, other academic and public libraries and the general public. The Unit scans a wide variety of materials, including but not limited to monographs, serials, microfilm, photographic negatives, oversized objects such as maps, blue prints and posters, yearbooks, archival materials such as correspondence and scrapbooks, etc. IS has a variety of digital image capture equipment including multiple cameras and digital backs along with tables and cradles to safely and securely hold the materials during image capture. We are experienced handing and capturing images from materials that are in good or poor condition. We can deliver masters and derivatives via hard drive or download.

VSim: Getting the job done with DSpace, while avoiding all the traps of customization
This will be a brief case study of how UCLA Library customized an instance of DSpace 6x, to deliver all the business logic goals of the NEH-grant-funded VSim project, while avoiding making any major customization of DSpace internal code. We'll shine a spotlight on some code we borrowed from the DSpace community, and the ways we bent existing functionality to deliver a working repository of 3D Architectural models.

Speakers
avatar for Danielle Kane

Danielle Kane

Data Science Coordinator, UC Irvine Libraries
CM

Cathy Martyniak

Director, UC Southern Regional Library Facility
avatar for Hardy Pottinger

Hardy Pottinger

Digital Library Software Developer, UCLA Library



Wednesday February 28, 2018 9:35am - 10:30am
HUB 379

10:30am

Break
Wednesday February 28, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am
HUB Highlander Union Building, UC Riverside, 92521

11:00am

Keynote #2
Join us for the second keynote talk with Don Norman.

"Why was I was asked to give a keynote: I know nothing about libraries.I suspect that is why I was asked.

In preparation, I have gathered together a group of graduate students to do ethnographic observation and design thinking. And I have asked my design colleagues from across the world for advice. (They have bombarded me with roughly 100 pages of ideas, some of which is even useful.) And I am carefully rereading Vernor Vinge's book "Rainbow's End," which prominently features UCSD's library (reading the digital version, of course). He talks of a time when books are all digitized by being chopped into little pieces, which are then blown into the air, photographed, and computer-stitched together as digital records.

Is this the future of libraries? I can hardly wait to hear what I will say."

Speakers
avatar for Don Norman

Don Norman

Director of The Design Lab, UC San Diego Design Lab
Don Norman is the champion of human-centered design. Business Week listed him as one of the world’s 27 most influential designers. He is Director of the recently established Design Lab at the University of California, San Diego where he is also professor emeritus of both psychology... Read More →


Wednesday February 28, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
HUB 355

12:10pm

Boxed Lunches To-Go
Boxed lunches to go will be available for those attending one of the lunch time Birds of a Feather sessions

Wednesday February 28, 2018 12:10pm - 1:20pm
HUB 355

12:10pm

Catered Lunch
A buffet-style lunch will be served

Wednesday February 28, 2018 12:10pm - 1:20pm
HUB 268

12:20pm

Digital Collections Assessment: Why and How?
Are you interested in learning how libraries measure the impact of their digital collections and what tools they use? If your answer is yes, this section is for you.

This inactive section will include three parts:

  1. Formal presentation on assessment metrics (both quantitative and qualitative) that are commonly used and easily tracked as well as the comparison of various methods that are being utilized to collect data;
  2. Small group discussion: members share their libraries’ assessment practices  and challenges associated with the assessment;
  3. Outcomes of the discussions will be summarized and shared at the end of session. 

The attendees will walk away with a solid knowledge of digital collections assessment methods and tools.

Speakers
avatar for Xiaoli Li

Xiaoli Li

Head of Content Support Services, UC Davis Library


Wednesday February 28, 2018 12:20pm - 1:20pm
HUB 355

12:20pm

UC Linked Data Project Birds of a Feather
Speakers
NG

Noah Geraci

Digital Assets Metadata Librarian, UC Riverside
AH

Arwen Hutt

Metadata Specialist, UC San Diego
RJ

Rachel Jaffe

Metadata Librarian, UC Santa Cruz
avatar for Chrissy Rissmeyer

Chrissy Rissmeyer

Coordinator of Digital Content / Metadata Librarian, UC Santa Barbara
avatar for Carl G. Stahmer

Carl G. Stahmer

Director of Data and Digital Scholarship, UC Davis
Carl G. Stahmer, PhD is the Director of Data and Digital Scholarship at the University Library, University of California, Davis, in which capacity he oversees a variety of digital initiatives on campus. He also serves as Associate Director for Humanities at the UC Davis Data Science... Read More →


Wednesday February 28, 2018 12:20pm - 1:20pm
HUB 367

12:20pm

Web Archiving Birds of a Feather
Speakers
avatar for Stephen Abrams

Stephen Abrams

Associate Director, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library
PB

Peter Broadwell

Academic Projects Developer, UCLA
avatar for Kathryn Stine

Kathryn Stine

Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy, California Digital Library
AW

Andrew Wallace

Digital Library Software Developer, UCLA



Wednesday February 28, 2018 12:20pm - 1:20pm
HUB 379

12:20pm

Preservation CKG Meet-up
Location TBD

Wednesday February 28, 2018 12:20pm - 1:20pm
TBA

1:30pm

Copyright Complexities: Promoting Copyright Education on the Digitized Campus / Copyright in the Digital Library: Where we Stand in 2018 (Combined Session H)
Copyright Complexities: Promoting Copyright Education on the Digitized Campus
The need for copyright expertise in academic libraries gained importance with the increasing reliance on digital resources and the use of electronic course management systems and e-learning platforms. The advent of MOOCs (massive open online courses) and other types of online courses necessitated that librarians be able to answer faculty questions and educate them on copyright law as it applies to teaching and learning in the digital environment.

This presentation will explore and discuss the promotion of copyright education on campus. It will discuss outreach, the importance of fair use, and how to encourage and promote fair uses of material. Images can be particularly tricky; there will be discussion of open images, images and resources in the public domain, and works with creative commons licenses.

Copyright in the Digital Library: Where we Stand in 2018
Digital library projects are wound up inextricably with the state of an ever-changing copyright law that governs the usage of everything from books to software. What can be digitized? Under what conditions? How can collections be used, to whom can they be made available, and subject to what restrictions? Court decisions, especially those about fair use, can change the landscape without much notice, and so can the much slower movements of Congress and the Copyright Office. This talk will review the current state of affairs for copyright and the digital library; highlight the initiatives, cases, bills, and administrative actions to watch; and venture one or two humble predictions about where things are headed.

Speakers
PT

Peggy Tahir

UCSF Library
avatar for Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe

UC Davis Library


Wednesday February 28, 2018 1:30pm - 2:25pm
HUB 367

1:30pm

DAMS Panel
Description coming soon!

Speakers
KA

Kristian Allen

Digital Library Technical Lead, UCLA
EL

Emily Lin

Head of Digital Curation and Scholarship, UC Merced
avatar for Sue Perry

Sue Perry

Head of Digital Initiatives, UC Santa Cruz
UC Santa Cruz, United States of America


Wednesday February 28, 2018 1:30pm - 2:25pm
HUB 379

1:30pm

Defining and Sustaining Digital Collection and Scholarship Services
Researchers across UC campuses are engaging in Digital Scholarship (DS), including building digital collections, with increasing frequency and across disciplines. Such scholarship includes an eclectic set of methodologies;i and researchers often rely on the library for needed subject, technical, and preservation expertise. The business models and practices that define library DS engagement are, however, in their infancy, extremely varied, and uneven.

This panel will discuss needed support for DS across a range of activities in order to better understand the challenges we are facing from service level, organizational, and business model perspectives. In advance of the conference, each panelist will prepare a brief, written statement that address the following questions:

-What current use cases demonstrate a need for DS services? 
-What are the demographics of the patrons we are serving? 
-Who are we missing? 
-How are digital outputs changing our collection and preservation strategies and what changes should we make in the future? 
-What additional or re-deployed resources and labor will be required to provide necessary services? 
-Are current and imagined services sustainable compared to more traditional library services?

During the panel, panelists will participate in a moderated discussion of the major themes that emerge from the written statements. Panel attendees will be invited to join the discussion for the final 15 minutes of the panel. Panelist responses to discussion questions will be published one week prior to the conference at http://ds.lib.ucdavis.edu/ucdlf/.

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Borovsky

Zoe Borovsky

Librarian for Digital Research and Scholarship, UCLA
University of California - Los Angeles
avatar for Mary Elings

Mary Elings

Assistant Director and Head of Technical Services, The Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley
EM

Erik Mitchell

Associate University Librarian, Digital Initiatives and Collaborative Services, UC Berkeley
I'm a librarian, administrator and researcher who cares about how libraries impact our daily lives. I have a passion for structured data and can be easily drawn into a conversation about why we focus so much library energy on metadata and information systems.
avatar for Stacy Reardon

Stacy Reardon

Literatures and Digital Humanities Librarian, UC Berkeley
avatar for Laura Smart

Laura Smart

Head, Digital Scholarship Services, UCI
University of California, Irvine
avatar for Carl G. Stahmer

Carl G. Stahmer

Director of Data and Digital Scholarship, UC Davis
Carl G. Stahmer, PhD is the Director of Data and Digital Scholarship at the University Library, University of California, Davis, in which capacity he oversees a variety of digital initiatives on campus. He also serves as Associate Director for Humanities at the UC Davis Data Science... Read More →


Wednesday February 28, 2018 1:30pm - 2:25pm
HUB 355

2:35pm

Closing
Speakers
avatar for Greg Lucas

Greg Lucas

State Librarian, California State Library
Greg Lucas was appointed California’s 25th State Librarian by Governor Jerry Brown on March 25, 2014.Prior to his appointment, Greg was the Capitol Bureau Chief for the San Francisco Chronicle where he covered politics and policy at the State Capitol for nearly 20 years.During Greg’s... Read More →
avatar for Guenter Waibel

Guenter Waibel

Associate Vice Provost & Executive Director, California Digital Library
As Associate Vice Provost and Executive Director, Waibel manages one of the world’s largest digital research libraries. Before coming to CDL, Waibel had extensive experience in the digital library and broader cultural heritage communities and is well-known for his work in promoting... Read More →


Wednesday February 28, 2018 2:35pm - 3:00pm
HUB 355
 
Thursday, March 1
 

8:30am

Intro to Library Carpentry
To Register: https://library-carpentry-2018.eventbrite.com

This full-day workshop will cover the “Introduction to Data” and “Unix Shell” lessons of Library Carpentry. You don’t need previous knowledge of the tools presented. The lessons bust technical jargon, demonstrate the power of the command line interface and give attendees the power to work with directories and files, find and manipulate data, and do complex search/replace. Library Carpentry is made by librarians, for librarians to help you: automate boring repetitive tasks; create, maintain, and analyze sustainable and reusable data, work effectively with IT and systems colleagues, and better understand the use of software in research. The classes introduce fundamentals of computing, provide a platform for further self-directed learning, and are relevant to all areas of librarianship.

Note: registration is capped at 30 people. If we get less than 10 registrants, we will not hold a workshop and reschedule a Carpentry in Southern California at another date.

More information on Library Carpentry classes is available at https://librarycarpentry.github.io/ 

Intro to Library Carpentry: http://bit.ly/CarpentryUCDLF

*Includes continental breakfast and afternoon snacks.

Speakers
NG

Noah Geraci

Digital Assets Metadata Librarian, UC Riverside
avatar for Danielle Kane

Danielle Kane

Data Science Coordinator, UC Irvine Libraries
KK

Kat Koziar

Data Librarian, UCR
avatar for Laura Smart

Laura Smart

Head, Digital Scholarship Services, UCI
University of California, Irvine


Thursday March 1, 2018 8:30am - 5:30pm
Rivera 140

9:00am

Beyond Copyright: The Where, What, Why, and When of the Public Domain
To Register: https://beyond-copyright-2018.eventbrite.com

The public domain is made of works that never received copyright protection, works for which copyright protection has lapsed, and items that fall outside copyright’s scope altogether. Given how copyright protection can limit digital library activity, understanding where copyright does not apply, or where it no longer applies, can be profoundly enabling.

This half-day workshop will cover:

-The basics of copyright scope. Where does non-copyrightable subject matter find itself in library collections? How does copyright apply to data and metadata?
-The basics of public domain determinations. When and how does copyright lapse? How can we make copyright determinations and how confident can we be about any given public domain determinations we make?
-Public domain determinations at scale. What can be done? What is the Copyright Review Management System? What are its advantages and weaknesses?
-Operationalizing public domain determinations. How can we take what we know about the public domain status of works in digital collections and put it use?

*Continental breakfast is included.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Wolfe

Michael Wolfe

UC Davis Library


Thursday March 1, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Orbach 240

9:00am

Literate Programming Workshop: Emerging trends in scholarly communication
To Register: https://literate-programming-2018.eventbrite.com

A fundamental challenge for open science is how best to create and share documents containing computational results. Traditional methods involve maintaining the code, generated tables and figures, and text as separate files and manually assembling them into a finished document. As projects grow in complexity, this approach can lead to procedures which are error-prone and hard to replicate.

Fortunately, new tools are emerging to address this problem. The half-day workshop will introduce a solution that’s gaining popularity in the R community utilizing the freely available RStudio development environment and other open source components. In the workshop, we’ll demonstrate how to create a “compilable” document containing all the text elements (including bibliography), as well as the code required to create embedded graphs and tables. We’ll demonstrate how the process facilitates making revisions when, for example, a reviewer has suggested a revision or when there has been a change in the underlying data. We’ll also demonstrate the convenience of integrating version control into the workflow using RStudio’s built-in support for git.

The following tools will be covered:

-RStudio
-Markdown
-Zotero
-BibTex
-GitHub

*Continental breakfast is included.

Speakers
avatar for Harrison Dekker

Harrison Dekker

Associate Professor and Data Librarian, University of Rhode Island
avatar for Tim Dennis

Tim Dennis

Director, Social Sciences Data Archive, Data Archive - UCLA Library


Thursday March 1, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm
Orbach G73